On Jan. 10, 2017, four major complex attacks and suicide bombings struck Kandahar, Helmand and Jalalabad and the Afghan parliament in Kabul. The latter attack claimed the lives of at least 38 parliament employees, according to latest figures from Afghan officials.

There was a time when only three nations in the world recognized the Taliban as the legitimate government of Afghanistan. And then there was just one — Pakistan. The other two, namely the governments of United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, severed or limited their ties with the insurgency just before the United States and international forces moved in and brought down the extremist government in Afghanistan.

And since then, the Taliban have continued to wage insurgency with increasing intensity across Afghanistan, sometimes wanting to be a political movement, but mostly launching violent attacks that have claimed a record number of civilian casualties each year. But the Taliban insisted it had nothing to do with a wave of attacks in early January that, in fact, the group was clearly responsible for.

On Jan. 10, 2017, four major complex attacks and suicide bombings struck Kandahar, Helmand and Jalalabad and the Afghan parliament in Kabul. The latter attack claimed the lives of at least 38 parliament employees, according to latest figures from Afghan officials.

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